Christmas House

I’ve been working in this neighbourhood in Cambridge, Ontario that spreads out on either side of Avenue Rd. between Hespeler Road and Franklin Blvd. It’s a modest part of the city where people seem to take great joy in their homes. Many along my drive home to Kitchener as festooned with seasonal decorations and lights.

20111218-091649.jpg

Blast off at the Satellite Motel

I love the naive optimism of this crude rocket sculpture that’s been on the Satellite Motel site for as long as I can remember. It captures the cold war worship of technology and the belief flying to the moon would somehow change the destiny of humankind. Wow, things sure have changed.

20111215-174925.jpg

20111215-174950.jpg

Unscene

20111104-071926.jpg
I’m unsure of the intention of this “sculpture” that rises awkwardly above one of the Hespeler Road entrances of Cambridge Centre Mall. However it takes on a more elegant look when isolated. I wonder if the designer/artist – consciously or not – is paying homage to the famous flying Canada Geese of Michael Snow’s Flight Stop sculpture in the atrium of Toronto’s Eaton’s Centre at Young and Dundas.

Hespeler Road Diorama

20110909-073241.jpg
Four days of the workweek I drive to the southeast corner of Cambridge, Ontario where I work as a digital media producer.
My route generally takes we along Hespeler Road, a commercial strip that has long been derided as a eyesore — a festering tribute to consumerism — ironically it’s always busy.
For me it is a diorama, a sliver of a dying car culture — frozen in time. Fast Eddie’s restaurant, a local burger chain with a self conscious branding, is a cultural icon on the strip. Its blistering yellow and red/orange concrete blocks rise from the landscape like a Lego pimple.

20110909-073452.jpg

It is the only restaurant I know of that has a walk-up window. This nod to pedestrians only reinforces the fact that Eddie’s does the majority of it’s business through the windows of idling vehicles.
As much as I want to dismiss Fast Eddie’s as culturally crude, I’m drawn to it’s audacious glow like a moth to a flame.I can’t bring myself to eat there; I’m afraid the food will never compare to the visual treat of simply looking at the building.