Limited Edition DVD Bundle Now Available

DVD’s are definitely old school technology, but they just won’t go away; so, I have a Limited Edition DVD of “Finding John Lingwood” in production.

It is available bundled with a general admission ticket for the great price of $19.95. You can order right now.

If you’ve already bought your ticket you will be able to buy a DVD at the premiere for $9.95. Credit card purchases ONLY. 

If you would like a sneak peek of the film watch the official trailer:

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How to choose a carpet … Lingwood style

Tickets for the premiere screening of the film are starting to move.
Be sure to order yours online BUY NOW

Anyone who – in their adolescent years – wanted to paint their bedroom walls black knows that putting your mark on a space makes it your own. 

Former president of the Kitchener-Waterloo Record, Paul Motz, had much more to play with when in 1970 his father assigned him to managing the interior details of the new Record building at 225 Fairway Road South.

One of his jobs was selecting the carpet for the space – not measured square yards, but measured in acres.

Although this clip didn’t make it into “Finding John Lingwood”, Paul’s detailed account of the process always fascinates me. Watch it below.

Why this Lingwood building was not demolished

Fairway Press - Personal_71-7916b_005
Photo from the Personal Studio Collection at the University of the Waterloo Library, Special Collections and Archives

In the late 1960s, the City of Kitchener made a deal with the Kitchener-Waterloo Record – an exchange … some property in downtown Kitchener for a chunk of land on Fairway Rd. across from Fairview shopping mall.

Former president of the Kitchener-Waterloo Record, Paul Motz called it “the middle of nowhere.”

The deal was made under the condition that the Record build on the site right way.

Architect, John Lingwood was commissioned by the Motz Family to design and build a new production/office facility for its chain of community weekly newspaper and the Fairway Press building was created.

(You can find out the details at the premiere of “Finding John Lingwood” my documentary about the modernist architect. Details to be announced soon.)

In the late 1990’s after many changes in weekly newspapers ownership or the closing of some, the site was sold to make way for the Best Buy store that now sits on the property.

But, the story of the building doesn’t end there … with demolition.

The building was constructed of prefabricated panels bolted to a steel frame; so, it was sold the Marsland Centre Ltd. of Waterloo, disassembled and moved to 101 Randall Drive, Waterloo where it stands today.

property_101-randall-drive-panoramic

Once a darling, always a darling

I’ve gathered at least 20 hours worth of interviews, additional hours of location video and 100s of photographs for my film “Finding John Lingwood.” The finished film … 55 minutes.

A mountain of information to work with and a lot left on the cutting room floor. It’s not quote as bad as you might think – logging all those clips, assessing their relevance and selecting the ones you think might be part of your story.

Not every word or thought an interview subject utters is compelling or fundamental to your narrative, not every photograph adds to the complexity of a scene. 

But … 

  • The person whose backstory tugs at your heart strings;
  • The interview filled with clever turns of phrase;
  • The beautifully lit locations
  • Moments when you laugh or cry or scratch your head

The “darlings” I call them – these stand out in your mind as you begin to stitch together your story. The more you are play the clip the more it calls out to be included. Intimacy clouds your judgement.

So, it is no surprise there comes a time in the editing process when you must cut your darlings to honour the story.

But, once a darling always … well you know how that goes. 

I thought you might like to meet some of my darlings. 

As you wait patiently for the premiere of “Finding John Lingwood” later this year, I will – from time to time – be posting some the compelling moments that ended up on the digital trash heap.

First up, this clip from my interview with Eric Haldenby, professor and former director of the Waterloo School of Architecture. Here he talks about Lingwood’s command of the principals modernist design and his work on the home he created for Dr. Roy Howarth and his family in 1957.